In search of a routine

In search of a routine

I believe that work is likelier than inspiration to produce good writing (or good art in general), but I’ve never successfully built a routine to write. And, owing to that, predictably, I haven’t written very much.

With that in mind, it was interesting to look through this collectionof writers describing their own routines. The most common thing I see when writers describe their processes is some…

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Hariman on popular trials

This week I’m reading Popular Trials: Rhetoric, Mass Media, and the Law (1990), edited by Robert Hariman. This quote stood out, and helps point to the communicative and ideological functions that cases like Marissa Alexander’s play:

We all will continue to watch and read about these and similar proceedings, discuss, dispute, and judge the stories told, constantly adjusting our sense of common…

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Baldwin on art

Baldwin on art

Art has to be a kind of confession. I don’t mean a true confession in the sense of that dreary magazine. The effort, it seems to me, is: if you can examine and face your life, you can discover the terms with which you are connected to other lives, and…

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installator:

"This is why Keith Haring got arrested numerous times." (publicdelivery.org

(via frankmunstah)

Found this concise, super-helpful explanation of what semantic code is, and why it’s important for web designers.

(Source: nbcparksandrec)

theatlantic:

Some of the Greatest, Most Popular Comic Books Are Feminist

Mainstream superhero comics are aimed at guys. That’s why Starfire, a character best known for her stint as an empowering icon for girls on Saturday morning cartoons, gets turned into a voracious, literally brain-damaged, libido-driven pin-up girl when she’s translated to comics. It’s why Wonder Woman, best known as an empowering icon for girls, gets turned into an excuse for buckets of bloodshed and gun play in her most recent comics incarnation. Data is hard to come by, but best guesses seem to estimate that the readership of superhero comics is between 90 and 95 percent male.
Last week, ThinkProgress's Alyssa Rosenberg confronted a bunch of mainstream comics creators about the lopsided nature of their industry. The result was predictable, if depressing. Speaking from the stage of the Television Critics Association Press Tour in support of the superhero comics documentary Superheroes: The Never-Ending Battle, some of the most celebrated and influential creators in comics dutifully ran through a list of the shoddiest and silliest excuses for their genre’s consistent misogyny and myopia. Executive producer Michael Cantor, Spawn creator Todd McFarlane, The Punisher creator Gerry Conway, and Wolverine creator Len Wein replayed the greatest hits from irate comments sections the web over. “As much as we stereotype the women, we do it with the guys” (McFarlane). “There’s nothing stopping the people that want to do [comics about girls] from doing it,” (McFarlane). “It’s like saying, ‘Why are there no medieval stories about female knights?’ Because there was only one, you know, Joan of Arc. It’s not it’s an inherent limitation of that particular genre, superheroes” (Conway). Et cetera, et cetera.
Read more. [Image: Sam Howzit/flickr]

theatlantic:

Some of the Greatest, Most Popular Comic Books Are Feminist

Mainstream superhero comics are aimed at guys. That’s why Starfire, a character best known for her stint as an empowering icon for girls on Saturday morning cartoons, gets turned into a voracious, literally brain-damaged, libido-driven pin-up girl when she’s translated to comics. It’s why Wonder Woman, best known as an empowering icon for girls, gets turned into an excuse for buckets of bloodshed and gun play in her most recent comics incarnation. Data is hard to come by, but best guesses seem to estimate that the readership of superhero comics is between 90 and 95 percent male.

Last week, ThinkProgress's Alyssa Rosenberg confronted a bunch of mainstream comics creators about the lopsided nature of their industry. The result was predictable, if depressing. Speaking from the stage of the Television Critics Association Press Tour in support of the superhero comics documentary Superheroes: The Never-Ending Battle, some of the most celebrated and influential creators in comics dutifully ran through a list of the shoddiest and silliest excuses for their genre’s consistent misogyny and myopia. Executive producer Michael Cantor, Spawn creator Todd McFarlane, The Punisher creator Gerry Conway, and Wolverine creator Len Wein replayed the greatest hits from irate comments sections the web over. “As much as we stereotype the women, we do it with the guys” (McFarlane). “There’s nothing stopping the people that want to do [comics about girls] from doing it,” (McFarlane). “It’s like saying, ‘Why are there no medieval stories about female knights?’ Because there was only one, you know, Joan of Arc. It’s not it’s an inherent limitation of that particular genre, superheroes” (Conway). Et cetera, et cetera.

Read more. [Image: Sam Howzit/flickr]

Keith Haring mural, Woodhull Medical Center, Brooklyn.

Keith Haring mural, Woodhull Medical Center, Brooklyn.

supplysideliberal:

image

David Byrne Fan Art

Economists use the Latin adage De gustibus, non est disputandum"There is no disputing of tastes"—to express the idea that in assessing an individual’s welfare, economists should use that individual’s preferences, not their own. This doctrine of deference to…

Will now be seeking a copy of Byrne’s book once the GMAT is over and done with.